Noble Journey Video Series

Men matter. They just don’t think so. Men are deeply motivated to earn respect and have a life-giving impact in their lives. But most carry wounds of regret and shame just beneath the surface that often disables them. Craig Glass’ teaching in the Noble Journey video series addresses the root cause of these patterns. Craig provides insight and hope for men who want their lives to count for something more than just themselves. These men matter because they live for others, and in the process find the legacy they have been searching for.

Episode Notes & Discussion Questions

Men struggle with unresolved issues of regret and shame from the past. Those inner doubts are magnified by the messages we encounter in our culture that question the value of men. This chapter is a direct clarification of the reasons that masculinity, like femininity, is a gift from God and that men do have a foundation of significance that is designed by God.

  1. While men and women have equal value in God’s eyes, and each gender wonderfully reflects God’s nature, men carry a unique spiri- tual mantle on their shoulders. Do you agree with this theological- ly? Do you feel it personally? What does it feel like for you?
  2. Dennis Prager says, “The most important question any society must answer is: How do we build good men?” What is your reaction to this statement? Do you think most men you know would agree with it? Would most women you know agree? Why or why not?
  3. On pgs. 24-25 is a story of two men who made Craig feel like he mattered, simply because they paid attention. Has a man done this for you? What did he do to show belief in you? Who could you do this for you now?
  4. How would you honestly evaluate your sense of either doubt or confidence that you matter? Do you regularly struggle with doubts or shame about your innate significance? Or do you more often than not find yourself trusting in your God-given capacity to bring an impact of blessing to others?

Though we think they are the same, guilt and shame are entirely different. This lesson clarifies those differences, explains the origins of shame, and what its consequences are in our lives.

  1. How did this chapter help you understand the key differences between guilt and shame? What are they?
  2. Shame can be produced by: Secular culture, graceless religion, unaccepting parents, the Enemy. Can you identify the source of any shame you have carried with you in life? What’s the source? What message does it whisper to you?
  3. We hide behind masks that seem to work for us in covering shame. Do you know what masks you use to cover up or compensate for shame?
  4. Healing from shame first requires acknowledgement that we are wounded, often an extremely difficult step for men. Have you ever thought you have wounds? Do you acknowledge them or prefer to move on? Or are you tired of acknowledging them?
  5. The steps to healing are:
    1. Embrace grace.
    2. Believe what God says about forgiveness.
    3. Believe what God says about shame.
    4. Bring friends into your journey.
    5. Renounce shame, verbally, repeatedly. Where are you in these steps? Which is especially hard to do?
  6. Granting forgiveness is primarily for your benefit, but it requires knowing whom to forgive. Have you been, or are you, able to forgive the one(s) who have harmed you? If not, can you identify what’s stopping you?
Though we think they are the same, guilt and shame are entirely different. This lesson clarifies those differences, explains the origins of shame, and what its consequences are in our lives.

  1. Shame can be produced by: Secular culture, graceless religion, unaccepting parents, the Enemy. Can you identify the source of any shame you have carried with you in life? What’s the source? What message does it whisper to you?
  2. We hide behind masks that seem to work for us in covering shame. Do you know what masks you use to cover up or compensate for shame?
  3. Healing from shame first requires acknowledgement that we are wounded, often an extremely difficult step for men. Have you ever thought you have wounds? Do you acknowledge them or prefer to move on? Or are you tired of acknowledging them?
  4. The steps to healing are:
    1. Embrace grace.
    2. Believe what God says about forgiveness.
    3. Believe what God says about shame.
    4. Bring friends into your journey.
    5. Renounce shame, verbally, repeatedly. Where are you in these steps? Which is especially hard to do?
  5. Granting forgiveness is primarily for your benefit, but it requires knowing whom to forgive. Have you been, or are you, able to forgive the one(s) who have harmed you? If not, can you identify what’s stopping you?

The great majority of men are vulnerable to lust, sexual temptation and/or pornography. This lesson examines the larger story of what is going on with sexual temptation, why men are particularly vulnerable to it, and how we can live in increasing purity in this core aspect of our lives.

  1. Do you have any recollection of your dad using, hiding or showing you pornography? If so, what were the circumstances?
  2. When was your first exposure to porn? What response did it bring up for you?
  3. On a scale of 1-10—“1” being it rarely draws your attention, “10” being it’s a significant daily battle—how would you rank your vulnerability to porn (or illicit sex)?
  4. G. K. Chesterton says, “Every man who knocks on the door of a brothel is looking for God.” How would you restate this in yourown words? In other words, while you may not stand outside a brothel, what doorway to temptation do you return to?
  5. If you ranked porn low on the scale above (1-3), is there another false idol or unsatisfied source of longing in your life that you know pulls too much energy from you? What is it?
  6. How do we live with, or satisfy in a healthy way, the unmet longings we all have?

Men and women are designed to love God and others with all their heart, soul, mind and strength (Mark 12:30). Men who use their innate strength to harm others, and elevate themselves are Shadow Warriors. This lesson reveals the quality of noble, selfless Courage that epitomizes masculine strength used as a heroic Noble Warrior.

  1. What is one of the most courageous things you’ve done? How did it require courage?
  2. Have you ever met, lived with, or worked for a Shadow Warrior— someone who uses their strength primarily for their own benefit? Who was (s)he? How did (s)he intimidate you?
  3. Who or what in your life currently creates the most fear in you? What next healthy step in addressing this fear would require the most courage from you?
  4. Who is someone you have put yourself at risk for? How do you do that?
  5. Can you think of principles or values you are willing to fight for? What are they?

In this lesson Craig describes the profound impact of Compassion when demonstrated by men who learn how to live as a Lover. These are men who reveal their hearts with others, and with whom others are free to reveal their own hearts without fear of judgment or condemnation.

  1. How did your father express his feelings like sadness, fear, joy or anger? Did he show them in a way that caused others to feel safe, afraid or clueless?
  2. How comfortable are you in showing emotions to others? If you’re comfortable, where did you learn that? If not, do you have any idea why it’s hard for you?
  3. When it comes to compassion, which of these is most true of you: You were born compassionate; you are learning to be compassion- ate; you are becoming aware that you’d like to be more compassion- ate; you aren’t compassionate at all?
  4. A Noble Lover knows he’s been wounded—he “walks with a limp.” Have you been deeply wounded in any of these areas: Heart (emotions), soul (spirit), mind (intellect) and strength (physical)? If so, how has it made you tender or vulnerable?
  5. How would you describe, in a few words, your mother’s impact on you? Your father’s impact on you? Did either leave a deeper wound than the other? What message did it speak to you: You don’t matter; you’re a disappointment; I’m ashamed of you. Put the message in your own words.
  6. The steps to healing from any wounds, including those from parents, are: Acknowledge, grieve, forgive, accept forgiveness. Where are you on this journey of healing? What will it take to move to the next step?

Many men are born compassionate; others learn it through their own suffering and pain. One of God’s deepest impacts in the world is to redeem pain and sorrow and transform it to compassion. Powerful, compassionate men stand out. They have a noble, magnetic draw that others trust.

  1. How did your father express his feelings like sadness, fear, joy or anger? Did he show them in a way that caused others to feel safe, afraid or clueless?
  2. How comfortable are you in showing emotions to others? If you’re comfortable, where did you learn that? If not, do you have any idea why it’s hard for you?
  3. When it comes to compassion, which of these is most true of you: You were born compassionate; you are learning to be compassion- ate; you are becoming aware that you’d like to be more compassion- ate; you aren’t compassionate at all?
  4. A Noble Lover knows he’s been wounded—he “walks with a limp.” Have you been deeply wounded in any of these areas: Heart (emotions), soul (spirit), mind (intellect) and strength (physical)? If so, how has it made you tender or vulnerable?
  5. How would you describe, in a few words, your mother’s impact on you? Your father’s impact on you? Did either leave a deeper wound than the other? What message did it speak to you: You don’t matter; you’re a disappointment; I’m ashamed of you. Put the message in your own words.
  6. The steps to healing from any wounds, including those from parents, are: Acknowledge, grieve, forgive, accept forgiveness. Where are you on this journey of healing? What will it take to move to the next step?

Smart, well-educated men are vulnerable to becoming “puffed up” by their own intellect. The man who genuinely loves God and others with his mind values wisdom over intellect. This lesson focuses on becoming Mentors who gain wisdom throughout their lives and then pass that on to others so they can learn from the Mentor’s experience.

  1. Who are the people in your life who can benefit from the Noble Mentor in you?

There are innumerable examples of powerful men throughout history, Shadow Kings, who use their authority and power for their own benefit. This chapter describes the enormous impact and influence of Noble Kings whose confidence is not in their own position, but in God’s ordained spiritual authority placed on them as spiritual leaders.

  1. What, if any, messages did you hear from your parents or other authority figures that caused you to question your confidence, value or significance?
  2. On what are you most tempted to base your sense of personal value or significance: Possessions, power, prestige, performance? How can you overcome this tendency?
  3. Read Psalm 139:13-16 and Romans 8:14-17. What do these pas- sages demonstrate about your value in God’s eyes?
  4. Has anyone in your life spoken blessing or anointing over you? When? Where? Why? What did that feel like?
  5. What roles of authority do you currently have in life: Father, grandfather, uncle, supervisor, pastor, team leader? Have you spoken, or could you realistically speak, a King-like blessing to someone in your life? To whom?

We receive an “inheritance”, the story of our ancestors, and their impact in our lives. We have no choice in determining that historical impact. All of ur stories carry significant sin and wounds. However we can pass on a legacy, to all we touch in our lives, which can be profoundly different. In this lesson Craig reveals that transformational process.

  1. How would you describe the legacy your parents passed on to you and your siblings? What are the primary ways they have impacted others in the family, the workplace, the church, the community?
  2. How much thought have you put into comparing what they passed on to what you want to pass on? In what ways do you want to follow their example? In what ways do you want to pass on a different kind of legacy?
  3. If you’re married, how was your wife’s “family inheritance” different from yours? Does hers look more like blessing or more like damage? Have you specifically talked about changes you both want to make in what you pass on to others?
  4. What next step will it take for you to make those changes?

As a gender men tend to focus more on their impact than their relationships. This can result in isolation and vulnerability to our own worst tendencies. This chapter reveals the urgent need for men to pursue brotherhood, and the life-changing impact that we can have in the lives of other men as a result.

  1. What has been your experience in trying to reach out to, or trust, men: In your family, at work, at church, in the community?
  2. The Bible smuggler who broke under interrogation did so because he was “tired, confused and alone.” In what ways are you:
    • Tired: drained, fed up, at your limit, physically and emotionally stretched?
    • Confused: facing complicated issues, hearing two sides of a sto- ry that don’t fit, needing to make a major decision but the right choice is unclear, just plain lost?
    • Alone: perhaps not literally friendless, but feeling alone in fac- ing the life-demands you deal with all the time?
  3. Do you have a group of friends you can go to for support? What can you and your group do to make your connections deeper, more genuine and life-giving?

Many men would confirm that the women in their lives are God’s greatest gifts to them. But just as many would say their relationships with women is one of the greatest challenges they face. In this chapter Craig describes how men can honor and respect the significance of femininity, and how we can also learn to learn to lead and serve women in the way that Jesus did.

  1. What did your dad do well as a father? What did he do poorly?
  2. If you are a dad, are there distinct ways in which you behave as a father that are different from what you experienced? What are they?
  3. If you’re not a biological dad, do you see yourself as a father figure, or spiritual father, to anyone? To whom? How did that relationship develop?
  4. Is there a particular difficulty you experience in your relationship with your kids, or anyone with whom you have a “father” relationship? Who can you go to for advice on how to improve those relationships?
  5. What is one area for growth you want to work on as a father or father figure?

The last verse in the Old Testament (Mal. 4:6) explains the enormous consequences of fathers who give their hearts to their children, or those who don’t. Craig shows how I Thess. 2:11-12 is filled with good news and specific examples of how a father passes on blessing to his children.

  1. What did your dad do well as a father? What did he do poorly?
  2. If you are a dad, are there distinct ways in which you behave as a father that are different from what you experienced? What are they?
  3. If you’re not a biological dad, do you see yourself as a father figure, or spiritual father, to anyone? To whom? How did that relationship develop?
  4. Is there a particular difficulty you experience in your relationship with your kids, or anyone with whom you have a “father” relationship? Who can you go to for advice on how to improve those relationships?
  5. What is one area for growth you want to work on as a father or father figure?

Henry David Thoreau wrote over 200 years ago, “The mass of men live lives of quiet desperation, and go to the grave with the song still in them.” That’s even more true of today’s men. Most men today would respond, “What in the world is my song?!” In this chapter Craig takes you on a step by step process to understand each man’s personal purpose and calling, their “song”, that can guide the direction and influence of their lives.

  1. Which of the Talents or Verbs listed in this chapter best describe how God made you?
  2. Which of the People Groups best describe a concern or interest God has put on your heart?
  3. Which of the Principles or Values describe something that compels you: You’d speak up for it; you’d be willing to get punished for it; you’d fight for it; you might even be willing to die for it?
  4. Narrow your answers to the above to one or two words each.
    Use one of the templates in this chapter to write a first draft of a personal mission statement. Is it memorable and inspiring for you? What words are unnecessary? Scratch them out. What additional words simply must be included? Add them.

Many raise the questions these days, “What does it mean to be man? What does being a man look like?” This chapter answers those questions in a biblical, inspiring and doable way by unpacking two significantly revealing verses in I Corinthians.

Be on your guard. Be vigilant for others.

Stand firm in the faith. Be consistently true to your convictions for the benefit of others.

Be men of courage. Stand up, speak up, act for those who are vulner- able.

Be strong. Use your gifts and acknowledge your limitations with those who rely on you.

Which of these qualities comes naturally to you? Which would you love to grow in?